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The liberation of Guiné

Basil Davidson
Penguin
Inglês

Estado : Usado 5/5
Encadernação : Brochado
Disponib. - Em stock

€10
Mais detalhes
  • Código
  • LT004951

Descrição

The liberation of Guiné - Aspects of an African Revolution.

Basil Risbridger Davidson (1914-2010) was a reporter until 1939 for the London "Economist" in Paris. From December 1939, he was a Secret Intelligence Service (SIS) / MI-6 D Section (sabotage) officer sent to Budapest to establish a news service as cover. In April 1941, with the Nazi invasion, he fled to Belgrade. In May, he was captured by Italian forces and was later released as part of a prisoner exchange. From late 1942 to mid-1943, he was chief of the Special Operations Executive (SOE) Yugoslav Section in Cairo. He parachuted into Bosnia on 16 August 1943, and spent the following months serving as a liaison with the Partisans. He was nearly captured or killed several times. SOE higher-ups sent him to Hungary to try to organize a rebel movement there, but Davidson found that the conditions weren't ripe and crossed back over the Danube. After the Soviets moved in to Yugoslavia, Davidson was airlifted out. He had enormous appreciation for the Partisans and Tito. From January 1945 Davidson was liaison officer with partisans in Italy. After the war, he was Paris correspondent for "The Times" (1945-1947), "Daily Herald", "New Statesman" (1949-1954) and "The Daily Mirror". From 1951, he became a well known authority on African history. He visited guerrilla-liberated areas in Guiné-Bissau in 1967.

The liberation of Guiné

€10

Basil Davidson
Penguin
Inglês
Estado : Usado 5/5
Encadernação : Brochado
Disponib. - Em stock

Mais detalhes
  • Código
  • LT004951
Descrição

The liberation of Guiné - Aspects of an African Revolution.

Basil Risbridger Davidson (1914-2010) was a reporter until 1939 for the London "Economist" in Paris. From December 1939, he was a Secret Intelligence Service (SIS) / MI-6 D Section (sabotage) officer sent to Budapest to establish a news service as cover. In April 1941, with the Nazi invasion, he fled to Belgrade. In May, he was captured by Italian forces and was later released as part of a prisoner exchange. From late 1942 to mid-1943, he was chief of the Special Operations Executive (SOE) Yugoslav Section in Cairo. He parachuted into Bosnia on 16 August 1943, and spent the following months serving as a liaison with the Partisans. He was nearly captured or killed several times. SOE higher-ups sent him to Hungary to try to organize a rebel movement there, but Davidson found that the conditions weren't ripe and crossed back over the Danube. After the Soviets moved in to Yugoslavia, Davidson was airlifted out. He had enormous appreciation for the Partisans and Tito. From January 1945 Davidson was liaison officer with partisans in Italy. After the war, he was Paris correspondent for "The Times" (1945-1947), "Daily Herald", "New Statesman" (1949-1954) and "The Daily Mirror". From 1951, he became a well known authority on African history. He visited guerrilla-liberated areas in Guiné-Bissau in 1967.